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The National University of Singapore (NUS) was named No. 1 out of 300 universities, according to the latest Quacquarelli Symonds Rankings, which polled more than 50,00 people, many of them academics and employers from around Asia.

NUS moved up from second place last year to dislodge The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, which fell to fifth place.

Several other universities in Southeast Asia also improved their rankings, underscoring the growing development and heft of a region of more than 600 million people on its way to becoming a single economic community starting in 2015.


Nine of the top 10 universities in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations “either maintained or improved their positions in this year’s rankings, which shows that the region as a whole is on an upward trajectory,” Ben Sowter, head of research for the QS ranking, said in a statement accompanying its release.

Within Asean’s 10 member countries, there are 6,500 institutes of higher learning with 12 million students enrolled.

Singapore was the only one that saw its universities place among the top 10. In addition to NUS taking the top spot, Nanyang Technological University jumped to 7th place from 10th last year.

However, Mr. Sowter said other educational institutions in Southeast Asia could improve their standards as regional collaboration and exchange programs strengthen through the Asean Economic Community – the single market envisioned for the region.

Asean includes some of the world’s fastest growing economies outside China and Mr. Sowter said university education will play a critical role in supporting the growth of the region and sustaining economic integration.

The QS rankings were based on responses to a number of questions related to academic reputation, employer reputation, student/faculty ratio and student exchange, among others.


Credit: Wall Street Journal.

The National University of Singapore (NUS) was named No. 1 out of 300 universities, according to the latest Quacquarelli Symonds Rankings, which polled more than 50,00 people, many of them academics and employers from around Asia.

NUS moved up from second place last year to dislodge The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, which fell to fifth place.

Several other universities in Southeast Asia also improved their rankings, underscoring the growing development and heft of a region of more than 600 million people on its way to becoming a single economic community starting in 2015.


Nine of the top 10 universities in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations “either maintained or improved their positions in this year’s rankings, which shows that the region as a whole is on an upward trajectory,” Ben Sowter, head of research for the QS ranking, said in a statement accompanying its release.

Within Asean’s 10 member countries, there are 6,500 institutes of higher learning with 12 million students enrolled.

Singapore was the only one that saw its universities place among the top 10. In addition to NUS taking the top spot, Nanyang Technological University jumped to 7th place from 10th last year.

However, Mr. Sowter said other educational institutions in Southeast Asia could improve their standards as regional collaboration and exchange programs strengthen through the Asean Economic Community – the single market envisioned for the region.

Asean includes some of the world’s fastest growing economies outside China and Mr. Sowter said university education will play a critical role in supporting the growth of the region and sustaining economic integration.

The QS rankings were based on responses to a number of questions related to academic reputation, employer reputation, student/faculty ratio and student exchange, among others.


Credit: Wall Street Journal.

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Vital Passage of The South China Sea


Credit: Wall Street Journal.

Vital Passage of The South China Sea


Credit: Wall Street Journal.

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Between 2008 and 2013 the annual number of murders in Britain’s three biggest urban police forces—the London Metropolitan Police, Greater Manchester and the West Midlands—declined by 34%. In the rest of the country, murder fell by just 7%. Burglaries have plummeted in inner London but have increased in some suburbs. Towns such as Brentwood, just east of London, have been hit by a wave of thefts by people who flee via motorways, thinks Louise McKinlay, leader of the borough council.

Drug-running gangs are increasingly building bases outside London, reckons detective superintendent Kath Barnes, of Hampshire Police. She runs “Operation Fortress”, a unit set up in 2012 to tackle organised crime following a spate of violence in Southampton, a city on the south coast of England. More oddly, last month guns including an AK47 assault rifle and an Uzi sub-machine gun were allegedly found at the home of a parish councillor in a Suffolk village. 


Credit: Economist.

Between 2008 and 2013 the annual number of murders in Britain’s three biggest urban police forces—the London Metropolitan Police, Greater Manchester and the West Midlands—declined by 34%. In the rest of the country, murder fell by just 7%. Burglaries have plummeted in inner London but have increased in some suburbs. Towns such as Brentwood, just east of London, have been hit by a wave of thefts by people who flee via motorways, thinks Louise McKinlay, leader of the borough council.

Drug-running gangs are increasingly building bases outside London, reckons detective superintendent Kath Barnes, of Hampshire Police. She runs “Operation Fortress”, a unit set up in 2012 to tackle organised crime following a spate of violence in Southampton, a city on the south coast of England. More oddly, last month guns including an AK47 assault rifle and an Uzi sub-machine gun were allegedly found at the home of a parish councillor in a Suffolk village.


Credit: Economist.

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Major Crude-oil & LNG Trade Routes


Credit: Wall Street Journal.

Major Crude-oil & LNG Trade Routes


Credit: Wall Street Journal.

@4 months ago
England’s worst state schools are no longer concentrated in big cities, either. Of the ten best-performing local authorities in Britain, seven are now in London. In Tower Hamlets, a largely Bangladeshi borough in the East End, children entitled to free school meals because of poverty do as well in GCSEs, the exams taken at 16, as do all children in England as a whole. Small post-industrial cities like Hull and Portsmouth fare badly. But so do many rural spots. Between 2005 and 2012 many of the local authorities falling into the bottom 50 by GCSE results were rural areas like Dorset, Herefordshire, Somerset and Suffolk. Most of the areas that climbed out of that sad group were cities or parts of cities.

The number of girls under the age of 18 getting pregnant has been falling rapidly in most parts. But here, too, the trend is uneven. In Southwark, an inner-London borough, the conception rate for girls under 18 has fallen by 64%. In West Devon, by contrast, the rate of pregnancies to girls under the age of 18 has actually increased in recent years—as it has in several of its neighbouring local authorities. In 1998 its rate was three-fifths of the national average. Now it is slightly above it.


Credit: Economist.

England’s worst state schools are no longer concentrated in big cities, either. Of the ten best-performing local authorities in Britain, seven are now in London. In Tower Hamlets, a largely Bangladeshi borough in the East End, children entitled to free school meals because of poverty do as well in GCSEs, the exams taken at 16, as do all children in England as a whole. Small post-industrial cities like Hull and Portsmouth fare badly. But so do many rural spots. Between 2005 and 2012 many of the local authorities falling into the bottom 50 by GCSE results were rural areas like Dorset, Herefordshire, Somerset and Suffolk. Most of the areas that climbed out of that sad group were cities or parts of cities.

The number of girls under the age of 18 getting pregnant has been falling rapidly in most parts. But here, too, the trend is uneven. In Southwark, an inner-London borough, the conception rate for girls under 18 has fallen by 64%. In West Devon, by contrast, the rate of pregnancies to girls under the age of 18 has actually increased in recent years—as it has in several of its neighbouring local authorities. In 1998 its rate was three-fifths of the national average. Now it is slightly above it.


Credit: Economist.

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